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Federal DOE Legislation

The Department of Energy (DOE) issued new energy efficiency standards for fluorescent and incandescent bulbs. In 2007 the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) was signed into law. It is intended to reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions, and established new energy efficiency standards for buildings, vehicles, and products—including light bulbs.This Federal legislation requires manufacturers to produce certain reflector bulbs and other household light bulbs that meet or exceed the new energy efficiency standards as stated in EISA.

The new standards are based on efficacy, and bulbs must meet new minimum Lumen perWatt (LPW) requirements.

Understanding light bulb efficiency standards

How will the Federal Energy Efficient Legislation effect you?

New minimum energy efficiency standards for lighting are being phased-in. This will impact many incandescent household, reflector, and linear fluorescent bulbs. Over the course of the next few years, some of these bulbs will be discontinued and will be replaced by more efficient versions. You will still be able to purchase incandescent bulbs.They just need to be more efficient.

When does this legislation take effect?

What light bulbs will be affected?

It will be phased-in 2012 through 2014 (California will begin one year earlier starting January, 2011).
  • General Service (Household) Incandescent and Halogen Bulbs
  • Incandescent and Halogen Reflectors
  • General Service Linear Fluorescents
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Legislation Timeline

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Lumens, a new way of looking at light

More lumens equals more light

Lumens perWatt (LPW) is an expression of how many lumens we get from a light bulb compared to how much energy (wattage) we put in. The light bulb that produces the greatest number of lumens per one watt of energy is the most efficient bulb (similar to a car that can travel the furthest distance on a single gallon of gas is the most fuel efficient car).

Lumen output and wattages are based on the most common products available for each medium base light bulb. Actual lumen output and wattage may vary by product. This information only applies to general service, medium base lamps, as listed in section 321 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). Other light bulb types such as reflector, 3-Way and candelabra are not included.*

*Source: US Department of Energy

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Light bulb exemptions

The following light bulb types are exempt from Legislation.


INCANDESCENT HOUSEHOLD BULBS–EISA 2007:

  • 3-Way bulbs, Appliance bulbs (Maximum 40W), Colored Party bulbs, Black Light bulbs, Infrared bulbs, Plant Light bulbs, Sign Service bulbs, Silver Bowl bulbs, Bug-A-Way, and Rough Service bulbs
  • Post Lights (below 100W) and Nightlights
  • Specialty Incandescent, Marine bulbs, Marine Signal Service bulbs, Mine Service bulbs, andTraffic Signal bulbs
  • Decorative Globes G40 bulbs (all wattages)

The following bulbs if less than or equal to 60Watts are exempt:
  • Decorative Candles (B, BA, CA) with Candelabra base
  • Decorative Globes (G161/2, G25, G30) with Candelabra base
  • Vibration Service bulbs

The following bulbs if less than or equal to 40Watts are exempt:
  • SpecialtyTubular (T-8)
  • Decorative Candles (B, BA, CA) with medium and intermediate bases
  • Decorative Globes (G161/2, G25, G30) with medium and intermediate bases
  • M14

INCANDESCENT REFLECTOR BULBS–EISA 2007:

  • Colored PARs, Rough Service, andVibration Service bulbs

Exemptions are expected to expire in 2014
  • 45W or Less: R20 and BR19
  • 50W or Less: BR30, ER30, BR40, and ER40
  • 65W BR30, BR40, and ER40

GENERAL SERVICE FLUORESCENT LAMPS (GSFL)–DOE 2009 RULEMAKING:

  • All lamps with a CRI = 87
  • Outdoor use: CoolWhite High Output (F96T12/CW/HO-O) and Daylight/High Output (D/HO-O)
  • Shatter Resistant bulbs: TuffGuard
  • CoolWhite Deluxe/Daylight Deluxe; Colortone50
  • Other length bulbs not specifically mentioned (such as 2', 3', and 5' bulbs)
  • Bulbs >7000 Kelvin that are Plant Growth, Cold Temperature, Colored, Reflector or Aperture, Reprographic, and UV

The following light bulb types are exempt from FTC labeling requirements:


ALL NON-GENERAL SERVICE BULBS:

  • Party bulbs
  • Rough Service bulbs
  • Appliance bulbs
  • Black Light bulbs
  • Bug-A-Way bulbs
  • Colored Party bulbs
  • Infrared bulbs
  • Left-HandThread bulbs
  • Marine bulbs
  • Marine Signal Service bulbs
  • Mine Service bulbs
  • Plant Light bulbs
  • Certain Reflector bulbs
  • Shatter-Resistant bulbs (including a Shatter-Proof bulb and a Shatter-Protected bulb)
  • Sign Service bulbs
  • Silver Bowl bulbs
  • Showcase bulbs
  • 3-Way Incandescent bulbs
  • Traffic Signal bulbs
  • Vibration Service bulbs

Notes:

Light bulbs =125V (including those rated at 130V) are subject to 15% higher LPW efficacy standards than products rated at <125V. 130V incandescent bulbs will no longer be available after July 2012.

California will make A-Shape (EISA Section 321) laws effective one year before all other states.
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Labeling laws for lighting

To help consumers understand light bulb efficiency, the EISA legislation directed the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to change its current labeling requirements for all medium based general service incandescent, halogen, LED and compact fluorescent bulbs. Manufacturers are required to provide brightness (lumens) and energy-cost information on packaging within a detailed "Lighting Facts" label.

This new label will help consumers base their purchase decision on the brightness (lumens) of the bulb and cost of operation, instead of wattage.* As more energy efficient light bulbs become available and less efficient, higher wattage light bulbs are phased-out, consumers will have this new source of information to help make their purchase decisions.

Effective date:

But there are a few exceptions to this rule:

  • 2011 (Exact date pending FTC final ruling)
  • Shatter-Resistant bulbs
  • Vibration-Resistant bulbs
  • 3-Way bulbs
  • Globes and Candles
  • Intermediate, Candelabra and Non-Screw Base bulbs

See the complete listing of exempted bulbs in the Light Bulb Exemptions Section.

Affected Light Bulbs:

  • General Service Incandescent and Halogen Household bulbs
  • Incandescent and Halogen Reflectors
  • Compact Fluorescent Household bulbs
  • General Service LED bulbs

*http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2010/06/lightbulbs.shtm



Understanding the new FTC label

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Technical Terms

GENERAL SERVICE INCANDESCENT BULBS are defined as standard incandescent or halogen type bulbs that:
  • Are intended for general service applications
  • Have a medium base
  • Have a lumen range of 310–2600 (40–100 Watts in today’s wattages)
  • Are capable of operating at least partially in the range of 110–130 Volts

CANDELA is the measurement of light intensity emitted by a light source in a specific direction.

LUMENS is the true measurement of light output and brightness.

LUMENS PER WATT (LPW) is an expression of how many lumens we get from a light bulb compared to how much energy (wattage) we put in.The light bulb that produces the greatest number of lumens per one watt of energy is the most efficient bulb (sort of like the car that can travel the furthest distance on a single gallon of gas is the most fuel efficient car).

COLOR RENDERING INDEX (CRI) is the ability of a light bulb to show the colors of objects accurately on a scale of 0 to 100.
  • As a general rule "the higher the better"— light bulbs with high CRI (80–100 CRI) tend to make people and objects look better than light bulbs with lower CRIs
  • Light sources with a 100 CRI are incandescent bulbs, halogen bulbs, and outdoor sunlight
  • Good = 60–79 CRI, Better = 80–89 CRI, Best = 90–100 CRI

KELVIN is the unit of measure for color temperature.

COLOR TEMPERATURE is a measure of the light bulb’s color when illuminated, and is measured in degrees Kelvin. The higher the number, the whiter, and then bluer, or cooler. The lower the number, the more yellow, or warmer the color. The whiteness of the light itself creates a mood in the lighted space.


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Reference Links

EISA (ENERGY INDEPENDENCE AND SECURITY ACT OF 2007)

Incandescent: Household, Decorative and Post Lamps (Section 321)
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/regulations/eisa.html

IRL Rulemaking (Section 322)
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/incandescent_lamps.html
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/incandescent_lamps_standards_final_rule.html

CALIFORNIA A-LINE RULEMAKING

http://www.energy.ca.gov/siting/title20/index.html
http://www.energy.ca.gov/lightbulbs/lightbulbfaqs.html

DOE RULEMAKING 2009 (DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RULEMAKING)

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/printable_versions/eisa2007.html

FLUORESCENT: NEW 2012 STANDARDS FOR GENERAL SERVICE FLORESCENT LAMPS (GSFL)

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/incandescent_lamps_standards_final_rule.html

FTC (FEDERALTRADE COMMISSION GUIDELINES) LABELING (2010)

http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2010/06/lightbulbs.shtm
PDF Link: http://www.ftc.gov/os/2010/06/P084206lamplabeling.pdf
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